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Clear Creek State Park

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Outdoor Serenity

Clear Creek State Park encompasses 1,901 acres, covering a scenic portion of the Clear Creek Valley from PA 949 to the Clarion River. The park has camping, rustic cabins, and access to the Clarion River fishing and boating. The Clarion River flows along the park border and provides fishing for trout, warmwater game fish, and panfish. (Photo by: Kyle Yates)

Things to do

Camping

Rustic Cabins and Camp Sites

Wake up to the serenity of Clear Creek State Park. There are 22 rustic cabins near the Clarion River, and 53 campsites each with a picnic table and fire ring. Near the campground visitors can enjoy a nine-hole disc golf course and a basketball court. Two canoe/kayak camping sites are located at the southern end of the campground. Camp sites and cabins must be reserved in advance.

Hike and Explore

Beartown Rocks

Located in Clear Creek State Forest a short drive north of I-80, Beartown Rocks is a rock city with a view. Massive, house-sized boulders, separated by narrow to wide “streets,” occupy a wooded hill on state forest land. Known as “one of the best kept secrets” in Clear Creek State Forest, these massive boulders offer breathtaking scenic views of the valley below. Hike up the rock formation staircase to take in a view of the valley below. Bring your camera! (Photo by: Rebecca Thomas)

Relax

Take a leisurely stroll on 25 miles of hiking trails along Clear Creek, wandering across the surrounding hillsides to several scenic overlooks and along the Clarion River. Most trails follow old roads or logging skid paths through second growth, mixed hardwood, and evergreen forests. An understory of mountain laurel and rhododendron bloom in mid-June and early July respectively. (Photo by: Kyle Yates)