Biking

With beautiful scenery all around, biking is one of the most popular activities in the Pennsylvania Wilds region. The trails in our forests and state parks cover a wide variety of terrain - from gently curving pathways to rugged, uphill climbs. Some trails are perfect for a leisurely day of biking while others are more challenging for serious mountain bikers. Many former railway right-of-ways in our region have been converted to biking paths as well.

In the Allegheny National Forest Mountain bikers can use most trails including snowmobile trails, generally open and gated roads in the ANF. These trails are best suited for expert and extreme riders. CLICK HERE for more information.  814-723-5150

In PA State Parks bicycling trails are paved or fine aggregate surface trails, which are generally flat. Mountain biking trails are single track natural surfaces with obstacles and steep climbs and descents. CLICK HERE to find our state parks and biking information for each one. (717) 787-2869

Many of our outfitters offer biking rental and other assistance for more information CLICK HERE.

 

Black Moshannnon State Park

4216 Beaver Road Philipsburg PA 16866

(814) 342-5960 | http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks/findapark/blackmoshannon/

Black Moshannon State Park covers 3,394 acres of forests and wetlands that provide recreational opportunities for thousands of visitors. The park conserves unique, natural environments and is in Centre County on PA 504, nine miles east of Philipsburg. More than 43,000 acres of the Moshannon State Forest surround the park and help create a remote and wild setting.

According to local tradition, American Indians called this watershed “Moss-Hanne,” meaning “moose stream,” thus the origin of the park’s name. Appropriately, the “black” in the park name describes the tea-colored waters. The 250-acre Black Moshannon Lake is fed by clear springs and small streams which flow through the bogs that stretch in most directions from its shores. As the clear water flows through sphagnum moss and other wetland plants, it becomes colored by plant tannins. In a sense, the bog vegetation acts like a giant teabag to color the water.

Back to the listview
Follow Us:
Twitter Logo FaceBook Logo Pintress Youtube Newsletter